The Games We Play

 

I am told that in the time when we did things our own way Elders and older family members taught young people through story telling and experiential learning. Games were created that engaged youth in activities that mirrored the work of their community so that they would have the tools they needed to survive.  While these games taught the children a variety of critical thinking and manual dexterity skills, their most important feature was joy.  Lessons are best learned through love and laughter.  In lives filled with the tasks at hand, is it still possible play as we go?

This post’s Photo by Rene Bernal on Unsplash

This is part of a series of mindfulness prompts that are based in Métis teachings. Each weekly post has an image specifically designed to fit the lock-screen on your phone. The idea is that you can make mindfulness easy, effective and beautiful all at the same time. Placing each new image on your lock screen serves to keep it in the front of your mind while the week allows you enough time to lean into the learning.

The Labours of Summer

 

I am taught through stories and lessons that we have a natural desire to work and contribute.  The old people believe that engaging in our labours in a positive manner builds our character and infuses our products with the energy needed to sustain us.  The Métis work ethic is rooted in hard work and survival, and defined by the concept of wahkootowin.  It is within wahkootowin, the understanding of relationship and reciprocity, that the true value of summer labours can be found.  As you lean into your work allow yourself to experience the sensations of your efforts and the joy that comes from supporting your communities and relations.

This post’s Photo by Tracy Laverty

This is part of a series of mindfulness prompts that are based in Métis teachings. Each weekly post has an image specifically designed to fit the lock-screen on your phone. The idea is that you can make mindfulness easy, effective and beautiful all at the same time. Placing each new image on your lock screen serves to keep it in the front of your mind while the week allows you enough time to lean into the learning.

The Meaning of Balance

The old people were masters at maintaining a respectful relationship with their environments.  They remind me that we have to experience both abundance and scarcity to learn the skills of conservation.  Balance is learning to live without fear of one or the other, but to understand the true value of enough.

This is part of a series of mindfulness prompts that are based in Métis teachings. Each weekly post has an image specifically designed to fit the lock-screen on your phone. The idea is that you can make mindfulness easy, effective and beautiful all at the same time. Placing each new image on your lock screen serves to keep it in the front of your mind while the week allows you enough time to lean into the learning.

Take what you need

The work on this page is my passion, and where I borrow, I give thanks.  Borrow what you need, share as often as you can, but let my name travel with my words so that the voice remains authentic.

This season, we have seen our world, our mother, take a long awaited and much needed deep breath of her own.  The birds sing louder, the four leggeds roam more freely and the scent of warming cedar has the space to reach our noses.

I am filled with gratitude for all that each of you has sacrificed to bring in this spring and cannot wait to learn a new way to be together that allows the world its continued breath.

Tracy

Some people are just ready...

©copyright 2019 Lavertyonline