La Leun Calendar

Welcome to a new (old) perspective.  This calendar prioritizes the lunar phases over our more common calendar, while keeping enough of the common understandings to keep you grounded.  The Moons are from a prairie Cree understanding and the teachings from my Métis/Michif teachers.  The calendar begins with the new Spring Moon, which is where it feels natural for some of the first peoples of Turtle Island (North America).

The Kooraazh of Generations

As we wrap up a season and a cycle my teachers are feeling the pull of generational knowledge.  Most of what we know and practice are understandings that have developed over hundreds of years and been passed on from ascended Grandfathers and Grandmothers.  It takes great Koorazh (courage) to push down our own instincts and accept the learning of those who have come before, especially in the face of great social and political challenge.

Like many of our relatives, we are often called to stand alone in the face of adversity and like many of our relatives, we do so from within the strength of our community.  Our old people have lived difficult lives full of risk and hardship in order to maintain every thread of knowledge and custom that they could.  Today we are asked to stand with Koorazh and breathe life into those threads so that our children may weave spectacular families and communities from them.  In essence we are asked to have to have the koorazh to see a future for our children as Métis in this place.

Photo credit is shared among; Federico Di Dio photography, Zdeněk Macháček, Bryan Walker and John Laverty

This is part of a series of mindfulness prompts that are based in Métis teachings. Each weekly post has an image specifically designed to fit the lock-screen on your phone. The idea is that you can make mindfulness easy, effective and beautiful all at the same time. Placing each new image on your lock screen serves to keep it in the front of your mind while the week allows you enough time to lean into the learning.

The Great Moon

This week’s moon is known to my ancestors as the Great Moon.  My understanding is that it is known as the great moon because throughout this moon, we are filled with hope for the coming spring and the start of a new cycle.  In this time, la fors (strength) of our people was being tested immensely.  Food reserves were often depleted after a long winter and people were yearning to spend more time outside.  Our four legged relatives were also feeling the seasonal shifts and often moved less during this moon, saving their energy for spring. During such hunger and restlessness, Elders and storytellers were tasked with sharing their most exciting and adventurous stories to keep everyone engaged.

Today’s photo courtesy of  Evan Leith on Unsplash

This is part of a series of mindfulness prompts that are based in Métis teachings. Each weekly post has an image specifically designed to fit the lock-screen on your phone. The idea is that you can make mindfulness easy, effective and beautiful all at the same time. Placing each new image on your lock screen serves to keep it in the front of your mind while the week allows you enough time to lean into the learning.

Kiyam: Embrace the Quiet

In traditional Métis communities, Kiyam (let it go) was an expression of non-judgement that is extremely important to our ability to maintain peace.  However, this word could use a bit of unpacking for clarity.  When Cree or Métis people use the word Kiyam what they mean is essentially – let it go, but not in the same sense that you would mean it in English.  In the Cree/Métis version of this word is a deep and abiding sense of quiet.  Let go of the anger, let go of the judgement, let go of the need for more – or less, let go of your need to win and within all of this, embrace the freedom of knowing that it isn’t yours to manage.

This way of living was highly valued by the Métis community. Learning how to share thoughts and ideas with others in a good way was paramount to the health of our communities. Children were encouraged to be critical thinkers and to seek understanding of the world around them in a way that prioritized listening and learning over asserting and expressing.

So even as we come together to seek wisdom and clarity, know that neither really exist and within all of that, Kiyam.

Photo credit goes to Nick Fewings on Unsplash

This is part of a series of mindfulness prompts that are based in Métis teachings. Each weekly post has an image specifically designed to fit the lock-screen on your phone. The idea is that you can make mindfulness easy, effective and beautiful all at the same time. Placing each new image on your lock screen serves to keep it in the front of your mind while the week allows you enough time to lean into the learning.

Take what you need

The work on this page is my passion, and where I borrow, I give thanks.  Borrow what you need, share as often as you can, but let my name travel with my words so that the voice remains authentic.

This season, we have seen our world, our mother, take a long awaited and much needed deep breath of her own.  The birds sing louder, the four leggeds roam more freely and the scent of warming cedar has the space to reach our noses.

I am filled with gratitude for all that each of you has sacrificed to bring in this spring and cannot wait to learn a new way to be together that allows the world its continued breath.

Tracy

Some people are just ready...

©copyright 2019 Lavertyonline