La Leun Calendar

Welcome to a new (old) perspective.  This calendar prioritizes the lunar phases over our more common calendar, while keeping enough of the common understandings to keep you grounded.  The Moons are from a prairie Cree understanding and the teachings from my Métis/Michif teachers.  The calendar begins with the new Spring Moon, which is where it feels natural for some of the first peoples of Turtle Island (North America).

Entering Goose Moon

Our moon names and teachings may seem cute or flippant to some, but each comes with a wealth of knowledge and understanding about the world and how to live in it, Goose Moon is no exception.  By mindfully watching and engaging with our relatives, our ascended grandparents were able to gather their teachings over generations, infusing them into names and stories so that they would not be forgotten.

Geese are extremely loyal, they mate for life and are protective of their community members.  In community, geese will keep watch so that others can eat and rest, rotating the watch duty to share the work.  When they make their long journey, Geese have the ability to fly much longer and farther than others because they fly in formation, which reduces the air resistance for those at the back.  Each member takes a turn at the front while those in the back honk their appreciation.

Goose Moon teaches us to honour our strong connection to our community and family.  Difficulties and change are natural parts of life and community is the antidote.  Much like the goose who falls out of formation when another is sick or wounded, we too must care for others and when change occurs or we feel overwhelmed, we need only reach out for support, and allow others to take care of us.

Photo by Gary Bendig on Unsplash

This is part of a series of mindfulness prompts that are based in Métis teachings. Each weekly post has an image specifically designed to fit the lock-screen on your phone. The idea is that you can make mindfulness easy, effective and beautiful all at the same time. Placing each new image on your lock screen serves to keep it in the front of your mind while the week allows you enough time to lean into the learning.

The Earth’s Reflection

As the last of the Eagle moon fades away I am drawn to the teachings of cycles and the stories I have been gifted describing humans as a reflection of the natural world.  Stories of the delicate balaans of ecosystems and all of their contributing parts reflected within us, as if we are tributes to the natural world.  The mountains and rocks are the bones that hold us, the water in the rivers – the blood that flows through us, the forests move oxygen like our lungs and the ocean is as consistent as the beating of our hearts, all there to teach us how to live a good and healthy life.  The key is recognizing that the earth, like our bodies, will always move towards balaans.

Photo by Zdeněk Macháček on Unsplash

This is part of a series of mindfulness prompts that are based in Métis teachings. Each weekly post has an image specifically designed to fit the lock-screen on your phone. The idea is that you can make mindfulness easy, effective and beautiful all at the same time. Placing each new image on your lock screen serves to keep it in the front of your mind while the week allows you enough time to lean into the learning.

Taapwew

Honesty is a very strong Métis value, and it has a different feel to it than the honesty valued by my European ancestors.  I imagine that most cultures value truthfulness to some degree, and it is in the details of the culture and language that the nuances live.  In Métis culture, the concept of truth is captured in the word Taapwew.  Translated, Taapwew means not just to tell the truth, but to tell the truth as I have experienced it, shifting the meaning away from something that exists on its own, towards something steeped in the grit of lived reality. 

The truth of spring is that as our side of the earth is beginning to lean more towards the sun as it spins in orbit which allows us to warm for a time.  One of the truths of my experience is that “Jackrabbits” let us know when to expect spring.  In fact they are much more reliable than our Southern cousins groundhog and way less fickle.  If you watch carefully, you begin to notice that the ears of our Northern relatives start to turn brown or black much earlier than the rest of their fur.  So when I see a jackrabbit with black ears, I know that warm weather is right around the corner. 

As you move through your week consider how different these two truths feel and breath into your own unique lives and experiences.

Photo by Chris Sharratt on flickr

This is part of a series of mindfulness prompts that are based in Métis teachings. Each weekly post has an image specifically designed to fit the lock-screen on your phone. The idea is that you can make mindfulness easy, effective and beautiful all at the same time. Placing each new image on your lock screen serves to keep it in the front of your mind while the week allows you enough time to lean into the learning.

Take what you need

The work on this page is my passion, and where I borrow, I give thanks.  Borrow what you need, share as often as you can, but let my name travel with my words so that the voice remains authentic.

This season, we have seen our world, our mother, take a long awaited and much needed deep breath of her own.  The birds sing louder, the four leggeds roam more freely and the scent of warming cedar has the space to reach our noses.

I am filled with gratitude for all that each of you has sacrificed to bring in this spring and cannot wait to learn a new way to be together that allows the world its continued breath.

Tracy

Some people are just ready...

©copyright 2019 Lavertyonline